ON STAGE NOW

Carrie the Musical

Oct. 25-26, 31, Nov. 1-2, 2019

Music by Michael Gore | Lyrics by Dean Pitchford | Book by Lawrence D. Cohen | Based on the novel by Stephen King

 

Carrie White is a misfit. At school, she's an outcast who's bullied by the popular crowd, and virtually invisible to everyone else. At home, she's at the mercy of her loving but cruelly over-protective mother. But Carrie's just discovered she's got a special power, and if pushed too far, she's not afraid to use it…

This compelling musical based on the Stephen King best-seller confronts school bullying, adolescent anxiety, and what we pay for our indifference.

• NOT RECOMMENDED FOR CHILDREN UNDER 13.

Is He Dead?

Feb. 20-23, 2020

By Mark Twain | Adapted by David Ives

 

Jean-Francois Millet, a young painter of genius, is in love with Marie Leroux but in debt to a villainous picture-dealer, Bastien Andre. Andre forecloses on Millet, threatening debtor's prison unless Marie marries him. Millet realizes that the only way he can pay his debts and keep Marie from marrying Andre is to die, as it is only dead painters who achieve fame and fortune. Millet fakes his death and prospers, all while passing himself off as his own sister, the Widow Tillou. Now a rich "widow," he must find a way to get out of a dress, return to life, and marry Marie.

Eurydice

April 23-26, 2020

By Sarah Ruhl | Based on the Greek myth of Orpheus & Euridice

 

On the day of her wedding, Eurydice falls victim to a tragic accident that sends her hurtling into a wonderland of an Underworld: ripped from her beloved Orpheus, the greatest musician in the world, Eurydice is reunited with her dead father in the Land of the Dead. Orpheus journeys to retrieve his bride, but Eurydice has begun to discover that the cost of living again can sometimes exceed the cost of staying dead. Full of dark humor, lyrical beauty, and wit, Sarah Ruhl’s Eurydice transforms a traditional myth into a visceral, contemporary meditation on love worth grieving for.

© 2019 by POUDRE THEATRE. No thespians were harmed in the making of this site.